Photograph by Marcia Kashnow. 2015.

I have been an aspiring photographer for more than fifty years. As a graduate student in physics in the 1960s I was drawn to the elegance of fine optics. With one of the first 35 mm single lens reflex cameras, I began to make street portraits in the style that still appeals to me: available light, eye contact, short depth of field. I usually ask for a little cooperation, but I try to capture a spontaneous gesture or a revealing expression.

In 2004, just as I was retiring from the full time demands of a business career, the best digital sensors began to surpass film performance.  This confluence was a happy one for me. I had time to learn from a few masters -- George Lepp, Stephen Johnson, Jay Maisel. And time to travel -- to Southeast Asia, to South America, to Africa. And best of all, time to wander the streets of Manhattan in aperture priority mode, a lens cap in my pocket.

Marcia and I have been partners since we met as teenagers in our hometown of Worcester, Massachusetts. We moved west gradually over the decades, with long and happy interludes in Upstate New York, Ohio, and Colorado. Since 1995, we have lived on the peninsula south of San Francisco, with children and grandchildren nearby. But New York and New England beckon, and we stay close to our old friends and our roots.

You're welcome to send comments or questions to me at richard@kashnow.com.